“A narrative that I have not experienced. A narrative that I have not lived”

BCM311, Uncategorized

storytelling-marketing-branding

The thought of writing another person’s story is a daunting and delicate process. Being given a responsibility, a responsibility of capturing the words and the emotions that come with and giving your best interpretation of that narrative.

A narrative that I have not experienced. A narrative that I have not lived.

The realisation here is…

The retelling of another’s story is never going to be the exact same.

I immediately think of that childhood game of ‘Chinese Whispers’. Chinese whispers, which I’ve now learnt is politically incorrect and considered somewhat offensive. It always seemed a harmless game to me but like other innocent parts of our childhoods (e.g. baa baa black sheep) have been stolen in our politically correct run world.

Anyway the point I wanted to make was, that the concept of that game is pretty similar the dilemma us storytellers have. That is, ultimately the original story (or whisper) ends up different in the hands of another person. It can be a deliberate or misunderstood change but more often than not, the story is interpreted different by the person listening.

How can we do justice to the original story?

We can’t always write down word from word what we are being told and then repeat exact words, as if it were some over rehearsed monologue.

As I reflect on my own experiences I realise that, we are all storytellers by nature. We exaggerate, we alter the details, we twist the truth, we take hold of a series of events and provide a story that makes interesting for our audience. Whether it be describing to our families an exciting Monday morning spent as if it weren’t mundane or an elaborate excuse for missing a friend’s birthday because we didn’t want to go.

It is our nature to tell stories. So, with another’s story, it is only natural that we tell it using words and emotions as if the story were our own.

By controlling the narrative, it is our best way of understanding the true meaning of the story and portraying it as if we had lived it ourselves.

Better late than never..

BCM311, Uncategorized

It’s a warm, sunny Saturday afternoon in the Gong and I, being the sloth I am have chosen to spend the day indoors. Instead of being outside in the fresh air, soaking up some much-needed vitamin D and working on my non-existent tan, I thought I’d use the opportunity to begin the practice of blog writing for a new subject BCM311. In classic form, I could have written this a week ago but better late than, never right?

The first week of… class? I feel class is too formal a word, our shared learning environment if you will, we discussed what the prospects of entering the workplace. I, like most others in their final semester cannot wait to finish our studies and find our place in the world. However, will it be all that we hoped for? Will we all be Steve Jobs (except the cancer part)? We don’t know what the future holds, all we know is the present. The present though is happy to categorise us and tell us who and how to be. The Myer-Briggs personality type as an example. I don’t need a test to tell me in an introverted person, like most I worked that out on my own.

Earlier this week I began filling out applications for summer internships, not jobs just paid internships, yet still I’m applying to these companies having to describe myself and why I am the best choice for them. How do I know that? What if I’m not that good?

As a marketing student, I’m familiar with having to market a product or a service, though now I found myself having to market myself to the world as if I am a brand. This concept of our own brand isn’t new, I mean we have our social media pages, LinkedIn and this blog so it’s not a totally unfamiliar topic.

The main question is: How does one who isn’t comfortable talking about themselves, convince strangers of their best attributes?